Thesis Preparation – authorised by Laszló Vincze, DLA

Credit Value: 30 / Recommended Semester: 10 / Neptune Code: BMEEPLA-900 BMEEPLASD01 BMEEPLATD01

For a detailed description of thesis preparation at the faculty level, see http://www.epitesz.bme.hu/dh/szab/. Instructor(s): 

Basics of Architecture – authorised by Tamás Varga, DLA

Credit Value: 6 / Recommended Semester: 2 / Neptune Code: BMEEPLAA202

Architectural planning is a creative process, typified mainly by an end result that is either one-of-a-kind in its details or uncommon as a whole. Hence, the design path is unique in and of itself. In the case of design activity, instruction does not only impart basic knowledge of the profession (the mastery and practice of which is a requirement of the design process), but also develops creative skills. The Fundamentals of Architecture class consists of weekly practice; before receiving each assignment, however, there is a general lecture held for all that year’s students. Within the subject, architectural pupils encounter tasks that require architectural-based problem solving and creative trouble-shooting. Classes of 25-28 pupils are run by 3-4 main instructors. In the course of the semester, there are several small planning tasks to be solved, modelling, architectural drawing, and technical drawing with equipment. Design tasks are built around a unifying theme or motto. Instructor(s):

Small Complexes (t) – authorised by Sándor Makrai, DLA

Credit Value: 6 / Recommended Semester: 7 / Neptune Code: BMEEPLAS711

This is a semester-long course that prepares students for the following two interrelated design classes (Complex 1 and Complex 2). It consists, however, of an independent planning assignment. Students design a detailed, textured construction, situated generally at an uncommon or special location. The goal is planning and practice with creative form and space construction, with an emphasis on the importance of the series of decisions (both architectural and specialised in nature) that arise during the work. The process spans creation of the textured (or structured) concept – in site-planning and construction organisation stages – to the planning of residences at the sketch-plan stage.

Complex Design 1 (p, MSc) – authorised by Miklós Jancsó DLA, Sándor Makrai DLA

Credit Value: 10 / Recommended Semester: 8 / Neptune Code: BMEEPLAM1TX

Complex design practice is a two-semester-long course during which a single planning task must be completed. Students are free to choose the location and theme – generally an apartment or public building in an existing residential area. The faculty supports participation in national and international public tenders. Work completed during the semester comprises the preparation of students’ plans including the conceptual planning (with design programs and research); the plan sketches; and finally, compliance with standards regarding the building’s structure, stability, facilities, and the technology of its working parts. Presentation of the conceptual plans and plan sketches is open. The instructors involved (department head, course leaders, and architect consultant) participate in the evaluation, in addition to interested students and teachers. Over the semester’s worth of work in Complex Design 1, and during its evaluation, greatest emphasis is placed upon the architectural aspect. Also included are two examinations and two make-up examinations. The assignments of a public tender nature serve to foster independent work, as well as develop originality and creative abilities. Of the four exam opportunities, completion of two is required, the results of which will influence class marks for the semester term.

Instructor(s): 

Complex Design 1 (tr) – authorised by Miklós Jancsó DLA, Sándor Makrai DLA

KXT

Credit Value: 7 / Recommended Semester: 8 / Neptune Code: BMEEPLA8818

http://lakokomp.blogspot.com

Complex design practice is a two-semester-long course during which a single planning task must be completed. Students are free to choose the location and theme – generally an apartment or public building in an existing residential area. The faculty supports participation in national and international public tenders. Work completed during the semester comprises the preparation of students’ plans including the conceptual planning (with design programs and research); the plan sketches; and finally, compliance with standards regarding the building’s structure, stability, facilities, and the technology of its working parts. Presentation of the conceptual plans and plan sketches is open. The instructors involved (department head, course leaders, and architect consultant) participate in the evaluation, in addition to interested students and teachers. Over the semester’s worth of work in Complex Design 1, and during its evaluation, greatest emphasis is placed upon the architectural aspect. Also included are two examinations and two make-up examinations. The assignments of a public tender nature serve to foster independent work, as well as develop originality and creative abilities. Of the four exam opportunities, completion of two is required, the results of which will influence class marks for the semester term.

Instructor(s): 

Complex Design 1 (m) authorised by Gyula Fülöp

Credit Value: 6 / Recommended Semester: 8 / Neptune Code: BMEEPLAS811

Complex design practice is a two-semester-long course during which a single planning task must be completed. Students are free to choose the location and theme – generally an apartment or public building in an existing residential area. The faculty supports participation in national and international public tenders. Work completed during the semester comprises the preparation of students’ plans including the conceptual planning (with design programs and research); the plan sketches; and finally, compliance with standards regarding the building’s structure, stability, facilities, and the technology of its working parts. During the design process, appropriate features and materials must be selected with particular attention paid to sustainability and ecological standpoints. Due to the nature of this technical approach, more emphasis is placed upon participation with partner faculties. Presentation of the conceptual plans and plan sketches is open. The instructors involved (department head, course leaders, and architect consultant) participate in the evaluation, in addition to interested students and teachers. Over the semester’s worth of work in Complex Design 1, and during its evaluation, greatest emphasis is placed upon the architectural aspect. Also included are two examinations and two make-up examinations. The assignments of a public tender nature serve to foster independent work, as well as develop originality and creative abilities. Of the four exam opportunities, completion of two is required, the results of which will influence class marks for the semester term.

Instructor(s): 

Complex Design 2 (p, MSc) – authorised by Miklós Jancsó DLA, Sándor Makrai DLA

Credit Value: 10 / Recommended Semester: 9 / Neptune Code: BMEEPLAM2TX

Within the framework of the Complex Design 2 course, students must make a detailed plan of a smaller section (a designated part 1000 m³ in volume) of the building designed during the previous semester. At the end of the semester, after the working plan (which includes research as well), they must submit a plan modelled after a contractor’s plan (made up of portions that address the building’s structure, stability, facilities, and occasionally infrastructure or landscaping plans). An important part of Complex Design 2 is the detailed planning of one selected architectural element. Presentation of the working plan is open. The instructors involved (department head, course leaders, and architect consultant) take part in the evaluation, as well as other interested students and teachers. Greater emphasis is placed upon all the technical facets of the semester’s worth of Complex Design 2 work and its evaluation. The semester includes two exams and two make-up exams. The assignments of a public tender nature serve to foster independent work, as well as develop originality and creative abilities. Of the four exam opportunities, completion of two is required. The average of the two best marks for the assignment will influence the calculation of semester marks for the course.

Instructor(s):

Complex Design 2 (tr) – authorised by Miklós Jancsó DLA, Sándor Makrai DLA

Credit Value: 10 / Recommended Semester: 9 / Neptune Code: BMEEPLAM2TX

Within the framework of the Complex Design 2 course, students must make a detailed plan of a smaller section (a designated part 1000 m³ in volume) of the building designed during the previous semester. At the end of the semester, after the working plan (which includes research as well), they must submit a plan modelled after a contractor’s plan (made up of portions that address the building’s structure, stability, facilities, and occasionally infrastructure or landscaping plans). An important part of Complex Design 2 is the detailed planning of one selected architectural element. Presentation of the working plan is open. The instructors involved (department head, course leaders, and architect consultant) take part in the evaluation, as well as other interested students and teachers. Greater emphasis is placed upon all the technical facets of the semester’s worth of Complex Design 2 work and its evaluation. The semester includes two exams and two make-up exams. The assignments of a public tender nature serve to foster independent work, as well as develop originality and creative abilities. Of the four exam opportunities, completion of two is required. The average of the two best marks for the assignment will influence the calculation of semester marks for the course.

Instructor(s):

Complex Design 2 (m) – authorised by Gyüla Fülöp DLA

Credit Value: 6 / Recommended Semester: 9 / Neptune Code: BMEEPLAS911

Within the framework of the Complex Design 2 course, students must make a detailed plan of a smaller section (a designated part 1000 m³ in volume) of the building designed during the previous semester. At the end of the semester, after the working plan (which includes research as well), they must submit a plan modelled after a contractor’s plan (made up of portions that address the building’s structure, stability, facilities, and occasionally infrastructure or landscaping plans). An important part of Complex Design 2 is the detailed planning of one selected architectural element. Presentation of the working plan is open. The instructors involved (department head, course leaders, and architect consultant) take part in the evaluation, as well as other interested students and teachers. Greater emphasis is placed upon all the technical facets of the semester’s worth of Complex Design 2 work and its evaluation. The semester includes two exams and two make-up exams. The assignments of a public tender nature serve to foster independent work, as well as develop originality and creative abilities. Of the four exam opportunities, completion of two is required. The average of the two best marks for the assignment will influence the calculation of semester marks for the course.

Instructor(s):

Residential Building Design 1 – authorised by Tamás Perényi DLA

Credit value: 2 / Recommended Semester: 2 / Neptune Code: BMEEPLAA201

This class covers the theory and fundamentals of residence building design, which is the same as the fifth-year and BSc training. The time for enrolment is the second semester, and the prerequisite for admission is successful completion of the Introduction to Architecture course. The goal of the class is the mastery of basic knowledge concerning the formation of a dwelling environment, residential building design, and housing topics in general. The lecture series presents the historical and intellectual evolution in housing design – providing information on the historical precedents and intellectual roots for the formation of residential areas and apartment buildings, as well as a special perspective on last century’s trends, which determine design practice to this day. Also presented are expectations (operative or otherwise) for the formation of dwelling areas, apartment arrangement methods, types of residential buildings in use and the specific requirements that apply, lessons of techniques used in professional practice, problems of apartment buildings’ architectural formation and aesthetic appearance, as well as fundamental relationships in housing architecture. Planned lectures will only deal with the exact know-how as necessary, and this knowledge must be acquired through the class textbook (Residential Building Design by Dr. János Bitó). The class concludes with an oral exam, questions being derived in part from the lectures and in part from textbook material.

Instructor(s):

Residential Building Design 1 – authorised by József Kolossa DLA

Credit Value: 6 / Recommended Semester: 3 / Neptune Code: BMEEPLAA301

This class covers the practice of residential house planning in studio, both for general students and BSc training. Prerequisites are the successful completion of Residence Building Design 1, Fundamentals of Architecture, and Descriptive Geometry 1 courses. Practice takes place once a week in the form of studio classes and consultations. The central elements of the course include the apartment, the main goal being the mastery of a basic knowledge of flats and their practical use, as well as an understanding of relationships between flat and building, building and environment. The flat, as a function of architectural engineering praxis, appears in countless forms. Obviously, we have no means to cover even all the basic cases in one semester – if the concept “teaching” even applies in the case of a creative activity. This is why the class focuses on developing the students’ approach to design work – to develop in students a complex, yet practical standpoint towards spatial arrangement and formation, after they have acquired a thorough knowledge of function. We intend for students, upon completing this class, to be capable of recognizing in all its depths a function – in this case, a flat. Later, in the course of planning, they can make independent, professional decisions on the basis of information they know to be true. That means they can plan good flats with little outside assistance.

Instructor(s):

Space Composition – authorised by Balázs Kemes

Credit Value: 5 / Recommended Semester: 1 / Neptune Code: BMEEPKOA101

The first semester of space composition is a creative practice course where students come to know the basics of space composition. In the process of completing abstract space formation assignments which develop creativity and evaluating thoroughly the solutions posed, pupils learn about the peculiarities and opportunities inherent in space creation, as well as the effect of architectural spaces on people and environments. This acquired knowledge serves as a background and aid when preparing concrete architectural plans. Classes are conducted in groups of 18-25. Besides the leading instructor, there are at least two, but preferably three consultants. Small planning assignments are introduced at a general meeting, and 1-2 consultation hours are provided towards preparation. Discussion of the work under preparation or finished work provides the backbone of the course. Every pupil presents his or her creation followed by group evaluation. The goal is to develop studio work in a creative spirit, where students comment on each other’s designs.

Instructor(s): 

Faculty-Led Planning 1 – authorised by László
Vincze DLA

Credit Value: 3 / Recommended Semester: 6 / Neptune Code: BMEEPLAT601

The most exciting and quintessential part of architectural design is developing and presenting the architectural conception. Bjarke Ingels, leader of the Danish building firm BIG, is one of today’s most marked proponents of the plan presentation as a complete genre – with the possible use of drawing, theatre, storyboard, video, and film. The plan has long since ceased to be a drawn document. It is much rather a comprehensive, spectacular, and often stunning performance of unveiling, in which the architect’s reasoning and powerful, convincing, thrilling rhetoric play a key role. In Faculty-Led Planning 1, tasks and plans are completed by groups of 3-4, with internal division of labour. The aim of classes is to master architectural conceptual practice founded on cooperation and to learn about the opportunities offered by constant advances in technology and visualisation programming. The task is the viable development of an existing site with detailed elaboration and active discussions to involve the owners and the widest possible sphere of interested parties (e.g., mayor, representatives) in the work, in the interest of protecting built-in values.

Instructor(s): 

Faculty-Led Planning 2 – authorised by György Hild DLA

Credit Value: 3 / Recommended Semester: 7 / Neptune Code: BMEEPLAT701

Architecture is not a master weapon – sometimes there is no need for it – at least, in the sense of its commonly known arsenal and artillery. We have a minimum of two examples of modern, rather successful, non-architectural designs: 1) the CH2 – 2006 Melbourne Council House 2, and 2) Bjarke Ingels or the BIG Office. If we must give a home-grown example, we are justified in thinking of Elemér Zalotay; only in his case, we lack the breakthrough success. Perhaps, on the national front, the intellectual accomplishment which is most worthy of mention is Péter Janesch’s European Hochtief-honoured Nyugati Negyed [Western Quarter] proposal, a pre-eminent part of which is the rehabilitation of Nyugati pályaudvar [Western Railroad Station]. In these cases, perhaps the motto is “the democratisation of architecture”, even if BIG’s example (and Janesch’s) indicates the success of a strong individual. We are not urging you to abandon the dream of famed architecture and ‘beautiful’ buildings, but alongside them a star has risen – a non-traditional and non-self-directed environment artist who uses essentially non-engineering and non-architectural skills to change our world for the better. In our experience, these are qualities that can be used primarily in the process of contemporary rehabilitations, typically located in the urban fabric, the key terms being contextualism, public participation, knowledge of environment, and information democracy. The course’s instructive goal is to prepare students to make planning decisions, to adapt to and work with exterior factors, and to maintain professional, success-oriented relationships with commissioners and the public at large. A means to this end is a design philosophy that strives to be competitive, contemporary, and accessible; that embarks from the needs and demands of the widest possible community; that abides by function rather than architectural form; and that seeks to adapt to the environment.

Instructor(s):

Faculty-Led Planning 3 – authorised by Tamás
Varga DLA

Credit value: 8 / Recommended Semester: 7 / Neptune Code: BMEEPLAT711

This course is available in the 7th semester of the design track for the “United Fifth-Year Architectural Engineers” Corps. Through a task suited to the chosen design faculty’s profile, participants can immerse themselves again – though far more thoroughly – in architectural studies of a given area and can create innovative, modern architectural plans. For the planning course, pupils begin working in smaller groups. The first part of the assignment is a fine-tooth survey of the location – including tours, photography, research, drawing, and the preparation of street diagrams. When the locale is known in its entirety, students must make recommendations for the utilisation and innovative urban architectural development of the design site. Then, of the plots specified in the jointly developed urban architectural concepts, each student chooses one and (while complying with the regulatory parameters) begins the individual work: the planning of a residential building. In the interests of a uniform appearance, each member of the group must continue to work with the others throughout the process, which a joint advisor will assist. The semester’s work concludes with an exhibition of the plan and the models.

Instructor(s):

Architecture and Visual Creations (
ÉVA = Építészet, Vizuális Alkotások) – authorised by Sándor
Makrai DLA

Credit Value: 4 / Recommended Semester: xx /Neptune Code: BMEEPLA0898

The goal of this course is to practice the creative process and to develop originality and the ability to plan in the sphere of visual arts. With the help of invited artists, each student creates a small work of art. At the beginning of the semester we announce the content and formal requirements of the actual assignments and the creations to be submitted. The classes consist of lectures (presentation of basic knowledge), studio work (corrections), and evaluation (analysis of artwork), held by known masters active in their fields. The course requires serious work at home in addition to attending classes. As a minimum requirement for enrolment in this 4-credit course, students must have a basic knowledge in the use of computers and photography equipment (camera) and an affinity for the fine arts (photography and video art, sculpture, painting, etc.).

Instructor(s):

Interior Design of Residential Buildings – authorised by Tamás
Varga DLA

Credit Value: 2 / Recommended Semester: 9 / Neptune Code: BMEEPLA0881

The goal of this class is to acquire a knowledge of the interior design problems that occur in the design of flats and architectural planning in general and to complete interior design tasks. Architectural traditions and modern initiatives are made known through general lectures and personal consultations on exercises. Further instruction occurs with the analysis of architectural spaces. (This includes the dwelling environment, interaction between the residence and spaces that connect it to the environment, furnishings, the interior design’s character, and psychological relationships among colours, materials, and forms.) Through exercises, students plan one selected portion of a complex design – one flat, portion of a residence, or perhaps the interior of a public space, its furnishing and design. Those enrolling must have completed the Complex Design 1 course. Preference will be given to students in the residential design faculty’s complex department. In the case of over-enrolment, better results in the Complex Design 1 course will be decisive. A condition of the semester’s completion is the graphic development, presentation, and electronic submission of the specified assignment portion. Instructor(s):

Residential Building Design and Current Public Commisions – authorised by József
Kolossa DLA

Credit Value: 2 / Recommended Semester: 6 / Neptune Code: BMEEPLA0897

Through the study of actual, current public commissions, this class provides a perspective on contemporary Hungarian residential building design praxis. Also, through past projects, it presents the main changes over recent years. The aim is to complement lectures in the Residential Building Design 1 course by acquainting students with as many concrete examples as possible – of contemporary Hungarian architectural creations and, primarily, of the bubbling, fertile, and often controversial world of public commissions. The highlighted standpoint and aim is for students to observe architectural praxis in today’s Hungary, even if that is through more or less successful answers to questions that are posed. Another goal is for students to develop a routine of following public commissions, as well as an understanding of the procurement system, where to find such opportunities, and the rules and methodology regarding tenders. The hidden aim, by engaging with the given public tenders within the course, is to develop an active discourse among pupils on the basis of the evaluation and ‘judgment’ that follows.

Instructor(s):

Dwelling Analysis – authorised by Miklós
Jancsó DLA

Credit Value: 2 / Recommended Semester: xx / Neptune Code: BMEEPLA0410

The Dwelling Analysis class supplements the fundamental courses and surveys, in the widest possible range, fulfilment of residential functions. That is why the course title does not specify flats or residences, but dwellings, which we define in the following manner: dwellings are where at least one person can spend at least one night in shelter. As this definition indicates, students analyse dwellings with the instructor’s assistance. The course’s direct aim is to immerse students in a knowledge of dwellings in terms of the variety of living spaces and extreme values placed on residential functions.

Instructor(s):

Residential Environment and Design – authorised by Zsófia Dankó DLA

Credit Value: 2 / Recommended Semester: xx / Neptune Code: BMEEPLA0882

Within the framework of this class, besides learning theoretical matters – the system of relationships between building and environment – the student prepares a complementary design as part of a complex plan, through the partial planning of a building’s micro-environment with the aid of colleagues in garden and landscape design, as well as public utility design. A prerequisite for enrolment is successful completion of the Complex 1 course.

Instructor(s):

Faculty Research – authorised by Tamás
Perényi DLA

Credit Value: 2 / Recommended Semester: 6-9 / Neptune Code: BMEEPLA0990

High-level university instruction is unthinkable without research in the chosen discipline. The course’s aim is to draw students into the residential building design faculty’s annually updated research themes and acquaint them with the method and processes of professional research process. Another aim is to channel the ideas of student body, equipped with significant innovative potential, into the intellectual life of the faculty. Research topics are announced yearly, besides the innovation projects that last years. Students primarily join the themes that are announced, although it is conceivable for the faculty to accept one topic proposed by students. During strenuous periods, two-hour consultations on a weekly basis are included in the course workload, although lectures will be held on five occasions during the semester to cover practical research matters. Upon successfully completing the course, students come to know their capacity for innovation. We teach methods for protecting and implementing their intellectual property. They also master the basics of knowledge transfer and initiating independent start-ups.

Instructor(s):

Architectural Perspectives on Obstacle-Free, Universal Design authorised by György
Hild DLA,
Sándor
Makrai DLA

Credit Value: 2 / Recommended Semester: xx / Neptune Code: BMEEPLA0920

Over the semester, we plan a public building with simple functions on a topographically interesting site. The obstacle-free facility will provide an example for ensuring equal accessibility. As a result of more complex thinking and the fulfilment of architectural means, formation of the building’s structures (ramps, stairs, lifts, etc.) and functional units (entrance, windbreak, operation, cleaning, etc.) will serve to create new forms and compositions. Therefore, the task is how to practice architecture while satisfying an apparently special set of requirements in order to develop creative and constructive skills. Two sheets (size A-3) are to be submitted with any number of drawings.

Instructor(s):

Organic Architecture 1 authorised by Tamás Perényi DLA

Credit Value: 2 / Recommended Semester: xx / Neptune Code: BMEEPLA0920

Organic Architecture is not a stylistic course of instruction, but an introduction to a method of analysis and thinking. Its aim is the mastery of a certain approach whereby architectural design can be treated consistently as a facet of life. This broadens students’ basic education, creativity, and knowledge of history and architectural history, as well as preparing them for the problems of everyday architectural practice. Lecture topics are based upon the inspirations that define Imre Makovecz’ philosophy: thinking from an anthro-philosophical standpoint, construction vocabulary and concepts (e.g., metamorphosis, imaginative approach, genius loci, living house), and the Master’s masters (Wright’s philosophy). Invited speakers present the wide-ranging oeuvre and its legacy from several perspectives. The semester includes three practical considerations, and an independent assignment must be completed in the framework of each one. Free-hand drawing and modelling are of great importance here.

Instructor(s):

Organic Architecture 2
authorised by: Tamás
Perényi DLA

Credit Value: 2 / Recommended Semester: xx / Neptune Code: BMEEPLA0896

Organic Architecture 2 builds on the spirit of lectures in the first semester that introduced approaches to architecture and knowledge of the world. During the semester, lectures are based on an understanding of Béla Hamvas’ work entitled Az öt géniusz (Five Geniuses) about the five regions of Hungary and their architecture, as interpreted by architects working in the areas (J. Jánosi, G. Erhardt, G. Helyes, A. Turi). The goal is to introduce these concepts which contain architectural thought and are derived regionally from the local communities. The semester’s second thread is preparation for the summer’s building and construction camp. To this end, there are presentations on building camps in Hungary and abroad, voluntary construction, and societal actions. As a continuation of the practice so far, there is a semester’s design task that forms the objective of the summer camp’s construction, prepared in two rounds and selected by the students as a whole.

Instructor(s):